Violence in the Care of Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Essay

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Violence in the Care of Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Essay

Numerous researchers have laid the area of their work on the violence in care of the adult with a learning disability (Bonner, et al. 2002; Coyne, 2002; Duxbury, and Whittington, 2005; Hegney, et al. 2003). This is because there is a rising demand in the in-depth study of the violent behavior in adults in the care center. The present topic holds a clear title and refers in a very straightforward manner of presentation to the topic, which is essentially in demand. We would say that the lock and key arrangement of the topic with the text have been exhibited in the present paper.

Strand (2004) and experts in the paper begin their essential focus of interest in the topic by providing a short background and literature review as relevant to the topic. They mention that violence holds its presence in the form of physical, psychological, financial, and sexual abuse. They also held their emphasis that the problem of violence in adults with intellectual disabilities is quite often underreported.

The objective for the present study as presented by Strand and colleagues was to study the present picture with more relevance to the caregivers. The focus was held on the Swedish adult persons with intellectual disabilities and their caregivers’ in-group dwellings. Violence in the Care of Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Essay. Thus, we might say that the selection of participants holds relevance with the overall aim and objective of the research.

It is important to mention that the best research finds its most authentic roof place in a good selection and application of design. In the present research, a total population-based survey was carried out. For the purpose of data collection, a questionnaire was forwarded to 164 staff members. The staff members had their belonging from 17 care settings for adults with intellectual disabilities. The staff members had their belonging from 17 care settings for adults with intellectual disabilities. ..

Background: Violence, for example physical, psychological, financial and sexual abuse and neglect, exists and is an under-reported problem in caring situations involving adult persons with intellectual disabilities and their caregivers, where both parties can be seen as victims and perpetrators.

Aims and objectives: To investigate violent situations involving Swedish adult persons with intellectual disabilities and their caregivers in group-dwellings.

Design: A total population-based survey.

Methods: A questionnaire, including violence towards adults with intellectual disabilities and violence towards staff members during 1 year, was sent to all staff members (n = 164) from 17 care settings for adults with intellectual disabilities with a response rate of 74%.

Results: Thirty-five per cent of 122 respondents admitted they had been implicated in or witnessed a violent incident towards an adult person with intellectual disabilities and 14% of the staff members admitted they themselves had been the perpetrators. Sixty-one per cent of the staff members described various situations when they were exposed to violence from an adult person with intellectual disabilities. Physical violence was most frequently reported. Most of the aggression occurred in helping situations when persons with intellectual disabilities did not co-operate or when both actors reacted with violence. The violent situations led the staff members to feel powerless and inadequate. In order to cope they discussed with each other or with the manager.

Conclusions: Violence seems to be accepted as a natural part of the daily care for adult persons with intellectual disabilities. Most of the violence is physical and psychological and occurs in close helping situations.

Relevance to clinical practice: Supportive interventions, i.e. supervision for the staff members and training of communication skills individually or in group for the adults with intellectual disabilities. Violence in the Care of Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Essay.

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Both children and adults with disabilities are at much higher risk of violence than their non-disabled peers, according to two systematic reviews recently published in the Lancet. The reviews were carried out by Liverpool John Moores University’s Centre for Public Health, a WHO Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention, and WHO’s Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability. These are the first studies to confirm the magnitude of the problem and they provide the strongest available evidence on violence against children and adults with disabilities. They also highlight the lack of data on this topic from low- and middle-income countries.

The review on the prevalence and risk of violence against children with disabilities, published in July 2012, found that overall children with disabilities are almost four times more likely to experience violence than non-disabled children. The review indicated that children with disabilities are 3.7 times more likely than non-disabled children to be victims of any sort of violence, 3.6 times more likely to be victims of physical violence, and 2.9 times more likely to be victims of sexual violence. Children with mental or intellectual impairments appear to be among the most vulnerable, with 4.6 times the risk of sexual violence than their non-disabled peers.

The systematic review on violence against adults with disabilities, published in February 2012, found that overall they are 1.5 times more likely to be a victim of violence than those without a disability, while those with mental health conditions are at nearly four times the risk of experiencing violence.

“The results of these reviews prove that people with disabilities are disproportionately vulnerable to violence, and their needs have been neglected for far too long,” notes Dr Etienne Krug, Director of WHO’s Department of Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability. “We know that specific strategies exist to prevent violence and mitigate its consequences. We now need to determine if these also work for children and adults with disabilities. An agenda needs to be set for action”.

Factors which place people with disabilities at higher risk of violence include stigma, discrimination, and ignorance about disability, as well as a lack of social support for those who care for them. Placement of people with disabilities in institutions also increases their vulnerability to violence. Violence in the Care of Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Essay. In these settings and elsewhere, people with communication impairments are hampered in their ability to disclose abusive experiences.

“The impact of a child’s disability on their quality of life is very much dependent on the way other individuals treat them,” stresses Dr Mark Bellis, Director of the Centre for Public Health at Liverpool John Moores University, a WHO Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention, and lead researcher on the review. “This research establishes that the risk of violence to children with disabilities is routinely three to four times higher than that to non-disabled children. It is the duty of government and civil society to ensure that such victimization is exposed and prevented.”

Proven and promising programmes to prevent violence against non-disabled children and adults – reviewed in WHO’s Violence prevention: the evidence, Preventing child maltreatment, and Preventing intimate partner and sexual violence against women – should be implemented for children and adults with disabilities, and their effectiveness evaluated as a matter of priority.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities reinforces the need to protect the rights of children and adults with disabilities and ensure their full and equal participation in society. This includes avoiding the adverse experiences resulting from violence which are known to have a wide range of detrimental consequences for health and well-being. When prevention fails, care and support for children and adults who are victims of violence are vital to their recovery. The WHO/World Bank World report on disability outlines what works in improving health and social participation of people with disabilities and promotes deinstitutionalization. Violence in the Care of Adult Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Essay.

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